"That Rug Really Tied the Room Together"

Thomas Sowell: Progressive, Liberals, and Race

Barack Obama’s great rhetorical gifts include the ability to make the absurd sound not only plausible, but inspiring and profound.
Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is BAMF.

Barack Obama’s great rhetorical gifts include the ability to make the absurd sound not only plausible, but inspiring and profound.
Thomas Sowell
policygal:

The brilliant Dr. Sowell. This ain’t rocket science. 

I do love Thomas Sowell

policygal:

The brilliant Dr. Sowell. This ain’t rocket science. 

I do love Thomas Sowell

Listening to a Thomas Sowell interview
Pete Robinson: Dr. Thomas Sowell appearing on this program just over two years ago, quote. "There is such a thing as a point of no return." If Obama won the whitehouse you said he would pursue disasterous economic policies. I suppose you think he's done just that.
Thomas Sowell: Oh yes. I'm one of the few people whose not disappointed in him.
That awesome feeling you get when your professor uses Thomas Sowell to bash liberals in class.

Shootings in Chicago and New York?

Both Illinois and New York have some of the strictest gun control laws in the nation. In New York you have to have a license to have a handgun in your home. In Illinois you have to have a firearms identification owner’s card.

Well, obviously their gun control laws have not worked. That’s because gun control is bullshit.

The idea that banning and restricting guns is simply going to make them go away is ridiculous. Didn’t work too well for prohibition either.

As for gun control advocates, I have no hope whatever that any facts whatever will make the slightest dent in their thinking - or lack of thinking. - Thomas Sowell

As a rule of thumb, Congressional legislation that is bipartisan is usually twice as bad as legislation that is partisan.
Thomas Sowell

tofamoustocare:

If Milton Friedman were alive today — and there was never a time when he was more needed — he would be one hundred years old. He was born on July 31, 1912. But Professor Friedman’s death at age 94 deprived the nation of one of those rare thinkers who had both genius and common sense.

Most people would not be able to understand the complex economic analysis that won him a Nobel Prize, but people with no knowledge of economics had no trouble understanding his popular books like “Free to Choose” or the TV series of the same name.

In being able to express himself at both the highest level of his profession and also at a level that the average person could readily understand, Milton Friedman was like the economist whose theories and persona were most different from his own — John Maynard Keynes.

Like many, if not most, people who became prominent as opponents of the left, Professor Friedman began on the left. Decades later, looking back at a statement of his own from his early years, he said: “The most striking feature of this statement is how thoroughly Keynesian it is.”

No one converted Milton Friedman, either in economics or in his views on social policy. His own research, analysis and experience converted him.

As a professor, he did not attempt to convert students to his political views. I made no secret of the fact that I was a Marxist when I was a student in Professor Friedman’s course, but he made no effort to change my views. He once said that anybody who was easily converted was not worth converting.

I was still a Marxist after taking Professor Friedman’s class. Working as an economist in the government converted me.

What Milton Friedman is best known for as an economist was his opposition to Keynesian economics, which had largely swept the economics profession on both sides of the Atlantic, with the notable exception of the University of Chicago, where Friedman was both trained as a student and later taught.

In the heyday of Keynesian economics, many economists believed that inflationary government policies could reduce unemployment, and early empirical data seemed to support that view. The inference was that the government could make careful trade-offs between inflation and unemployment, and thus “fine tune” the economy.

Milton Friedman challenged this view with both facts and analysis. He showed that the relationship between inflation and unemployment held only in the short run, when the inflation was unexpected. But, after everyone got used to inflation, unemployment could be just as high with high inflation as it had been with low inflation.

When both unemployment and inflation rose at the same time in the 1970s — “stagflation,” as it was called — the idea of the government “fine tuning” the economy faded away. There are still some die-hard Keynesians today who keep insisting that the government’s “stimulus” spending would have worked, if only it was bigger and lasted longer.

This is one of those heads-I-win-and-tails-you-lose arguments. Even if the government spends itself into bankruptcy and the economy still does not recover, Keynesians can always say that it would have worked if only the government had spent more.

Although Milton Friedman became someone regarded as a conservative icon, he considered himself a liberal in the original sense of the word — someone who believes in the liberty of the individual, free of government intrusions. Far from trying to conserve things as they are, he wrote a book titled “Tyranny of the Status Quo.”

Milton Friedman proposed radical changes in policies and institution ranging from the public schools to the Federal Reserve. It is liberals who want to conserve and expand the welfare state.

As a student of Professor Friedman back in 1960, I was struck by two things — his tough grading standards and the fact that he had a black secretary. This was years before affirmative action. People on the left exhibit blacks as mascots. But I never heard Milton Friedman say that he had a black secretary, though she was with him for decades. Both his grading standards and his refusal to try to be politically correct increased my respect for him.

Racism is not dead, but it is on life support—kept alive by politicians, race hustlers and people who get a sense of superiority by denouncing others as ‘racists.’
Thomas Sowell (via leftybegone)

Unfortunately, the media intelligentsia tend to favor gun control laws, so a lot of hard facts about the futility, or the counterproductive consequences of such laws, never reach the public through the media.

We hear a lot about countries with stronger gun control laws than the United States that have lower murder rates. But we very seldom hear about countries with stronger gun control laws than the United States that have higher murder rates, such as Russia and Brazil.

Thomas Sowell
Thomas Sowell. I think this explains liberals quite well. I blame the Disney Channel.

Thomas Sowell. I think this explains liberals quite well. I blame the Disney Channel.

I wonder what Thomas Sowell would have to say about all these social justice blogs on Tumblr.

I wonder what Thomas Sowell would have to say about all these social justice blogs on Tumblr.