"That Rug Really Tied the Room Together"

Capitalism allows us to have all the toppings we want for our pizzas.

What kind of toppings would a communist system have? Potatoes and Vodka?

Capitalism: 1 Communism: 0 

Professor: There is nothing good about capitalism. *Says this while playing with an iphone*

Me:

image

I Love Capitalism!!!

Devout Capitalist and Proud!

I AM THE DEVOUT CAPITALIST THAT IS BRINGING YOU DOWN!

Milton Friedman. The case against equal pay for equal work.

Every socialist is a disguised dictator.
Ludwig von Mises, Human Action.
A government that sets out to abolish market prices is inevitably driven toward the abolition of private property; it has to recognize that there is no middle way between the system of private property in the means of production combined with free contract, and the system of common ownership of the means of production, or socialism. It is gradually forced toward compulsory production, universal obligation to labor, rationing of consumption, and, finally, official regulation of the whole of production and consumption.
Ludwig von Mises, The Theory of Money and Credit, pg 281.
The fact that the market is not doing what we wish it would do is no reason to automatically assume that the government would do better.
Thomas Sowell
Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself.
Milton Friedman (via thedailyliberty)
You know on a personal note.

Milton Friedman is the guy who really turned me on to the free market and somewhat opened the door to my libertarianism. I’ve always had a deep respect and admiration for him.

"There’s no such thing as a free lunch." -Milton Friedman

policygal:

Happy Birthday to the great Milton Friedman, who would have turned 100 years old today. Oh, how we wish you were here.

policygal:

Happy Birthday to the great Milton Friedman, who would have turned 100 years old today. Oh, how we wish you were here.

You have a right to your life, liberty and property. You do not have a right to your neighbor’s life, liberty, or property.
My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.

~ John F. Kennedy

(via american-writer)

"In a much quoted passage in his inaugural address, President Kennedy said, "Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country." Neither half of the statement expresses a relation between the citizen and his government that is worthy of the ideals of free men in a free society. The paternalistic “what your country can do for you” implies that government is the patron, the citizen the ward, a view that is at odds with the free man’s belief in his own responsibility for his own destiny. The organismic, “what you can do for your ‘country” implies the government is the master or the deity, the citizen, the servant or the votary.

To the free man, the country is the collection of individuals who compose it, not something over and above them. He is proud of a common heritage and loyal to common traditions. But he regards government as a means, an instrumentality, neither a grantor of favors and gifts, nor a master or god to be blindly worshipped and served. He recognizes no national goal except as it is the consensus of the goals that the citizens severally serve. He recognizes no national purpose except as it is the consensus of the purposes for which the citizens severally strive.

The free man will ask neither what his country can do for him nor what he can do for his country. He will ask rather “What can I and my compatriots do through government” to help us discharge our individual responsibilities, to achieve our several goals and purposes, and above all, to protect our freedom?


And he will accompany this question with another: How can we keep the government we create from becoming a Frankenstein that will destroy the very freedom we establish it to protect?

Freedom is a rare and delicate plant. Our minds tell us, and history confirms, that the great threat to freedom is the concentration of power. Government is necessary to preserve our freedom, it is an instrument through which we can exercise our freedom; yet by concentrating power in political hands, it is also a threat to freedom. Even though the men who wield this power initially be of good will and even though they be not corrupted by the power they exercise, the power will both attract and form men of a different stamp.” - Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom.


I’m going to have to agree with Milton Friedman on this.

ronsays:

Ron Swanson says ‘Capitalism: God’s way of determining who is smart and who is poor.’

ronsays:

Ron Swanson says ‘Capitalism: God’s way of determining who is smart and who is poor.’

How evil can one man be?

How evil can one man be?